MAGDALEN HEALTH ADVICE

Ski-fun.png
21/Nov/2019

 

We give our top tips on how to get the most out of your ski holiday and avoid injury with good preparation.

For many of us a ski holiday is the perfect way to get away in the winter and do some physical exercise. The only problem is, due to the short days and cold nights, most of us have actually cut down on our level of exercise during the winter.

BEFORE YOU GO

Start early – Get yourself to the gym, pilates, aerobics at least 1 month before your holiday and work on your core abdominal muscles and leg strength.

Don’t just sit there – Squats, sit ups and cycling is good to target the right muscles needed for skiing.

It’s a balancing act – Balance is the single most important factor in skiing. Use a wobble board to improve balance and build up ankle muscles. For a thorough ankle work-out, rocking heel to toe is good for snowboarders and left to right is best for skiers.

Get it checked – Most skiers find turning one way easier than the other. Poor technique might not be the problem – muscle weakness and joint alignment could be. Visit one of our osteopaths to sort out any misalignments and improve performance.

AT HOME

Work those legs  – You need to target the thigh muscles (quadriceps) so squat and stand up repetitively whilst making tea, brushing your teeth or in the adverts on TV. As you get more advanced do your squats on a bed or wobble board to improve your coordination and stability. One legged squats are next.

Challenge! – Think you’re an expert skier and well coordinated? I will believe you if you can do a one legged squats on your bed, with both eyes shut for more than one minute without falling over! – TRY IT!

Target the calves – Due to being on a heel or toe edge on your board, your key muscles are on the front and back of the calf. To train them walk up and down the corridor on your tip toes and then return only on your heels (ie lifting your toes off the floor). You’ll look strange but it really works.

Sit down, stand up – As you spend a lot of time sitting in the snow and getting up, your arms get a good work out and in particular your triceps muscles. Practise by placing your back to a table, resting your hand on the edge and dipping the body down and then pressing up.

ON THE SLOPES

Hot and Cold – Warm up before strenuous skiing. Start off gently rather than heading first for the black runs and round the day off with a stretch.

Take plenty of breaks – Overexertion will ruin your holiday – moderate the length of skiing time and listen to your body. Pain is a warning sign, don’t ignore it.

Liquid lunch – Drink plenty of water and isotonic drinks to avoid dehydration and stay clear of alcohol, tea and coffee. Drink plenty with breakfast.

Put the boot in – No matter how many lessons, skiers won’t improve without the right boots and this is where most skiers put their first foot wrong. Skiers often choose on comfort alone – don’t make this mistake. Get a moulded footbed (called Orthotics) from the ski shop first as this improves fit, comfort and ski control. Opt for a shop with a wide range of boots so you are spoilt for choice (Freeride in Meribel, Precision Ski in Val d’Isere/Les Arcs, Footworks in Chamonix).

Carry on – Always be careful when carrying skis/boards. Leave them standing upright so you don’t have to bend to pick them up. Carry them over your shoulder, swapping shoulders regularly.

Ice is nice – With an acute injury, use ice rather than heat.

Tread carefully – A great deal of people are injured by slipping on ice at the ski resort, not just on the slopes. Wear shoes with a deep treaded sole and use strap-on studs for ski boots to help keep you upright. Good for snow in Exeter as well!

Get Protected – Buy a helmet and wrist guards before you have a fall.

WHEN YOU GET HOME

Should you be unfortunate enough to be injured during your holiday, all our osteopaths are experienced in treating sports injuries and post operative rehabilitation so don’t put off getting treatment on your return.

Book Online

Have a great holiday!

Bon Ski

 


philwylie1.jpg
21/Nov/2019

INTERNATIONAL DUATHlETE

Phil Wylie

GB Elite V40 Duathlete

Jeanette Mcfadzean gets the inside track from Elite Athlete Phil Wylie about what’s ahead for the him this year and why he uses Magdalen Active Health to get him ‘up, fit and, active’.

To be in the presence of anyone that can run a 2:33 marathon is an awe-inspiring experience. To sit, chat, drink coffee and listen to their journey is awesome.

Exeter’s Magdalen Road is the home of some great coffee shops, French butchers, bohemian cafes and a health hub that treats many clients one of them being Phil Wylie, Great Britain Elite Duathlete: Run- Bike -Run

So what makes: a Gold World Champion team medalist, 2 times individual Bronze medalist- European Championship and a 4th placed World Champion?

In 1998, aged 20, Phil worked in a gym yet he couldn’t swim 2 lengths without gasping for breath. He couldn’t understand how he appeared fit and healthy yet all the other guys were smashing out great times in Duathalon events. ‘I thought how hard can it be?’, he says. ‘It really wasn’t’. Starting slow, he built it up bit by bit and then by 2006 he registered as a competing athlete.

13 years of competitive training across the disciplines of running

and cycling must take its toll. How have you managed?

‘I used to live near Bath and train out of the University but in 2013 I moved to the southwest and in doing so I lost that support structure of physios, conditioning coaches etc. I was preparing for the worlds and I’d picked up a niggle. My mother had previously used an Osteopath and so I had some understanding of what they do. I did tons of research and I was drawn to Toby (One of the directors of Magdalen Active Health) as an experience Osteopath who understood sports in both men and woman.’

So how was that first experience with Toby?

‘What I found comforting was that Toby understood I was training for an important event. He didn’t say no, or stop. He gave me a clear direction: 3 treatments would be required, I would need a range of treatments such as- manipulation, dry needling and massage, I would be right for the worlds. When someone does that for you they give you reassurance and confidence’.

So how did it work out?

‘With session one and two there was some improvement. I was concerned but Toby reassured me. 5 days after the third session all the discomfort had gone. 6-8 weeks later I got my 4th place in the World championship, 20 secs off the Bronze medal. I was gutted but it was a great result. 3 months later I got a Bronze at the Europeans.

That’s such an achievement. But how do you find training at this level for so many years?

‘I love what I do, I work with a charity that supports kids to participate in support and I enjoy training outside this. There’s no funding so it’s difficult but I’ve no desire to stop at the elite level. I’ve started to mix things up a bit recently by running the Tavi 7 ( 1st place and course record) and the Bideford 10 miles. It’s important as you get older to rest , recover, get more treatment and strength and conditioning.

Toby’s changed his approach as I’ve changed as an athlete. There’s no ego, he’s encouraged me to use the whole team at Magdalen Active Health. I’ve seen Esmee for acupuncture, Dan for a different approach to my treatment, Jenny for Sports massage. That’s what’s great and unique about Magdalen Active Health; they create a bespoke solution for you, around your life and your expectations’.

So you’d really recommend them ?

‘I use them for maintenance and now my wife, mother and son also use them. My son had a dairy

intolerance and was delivered by c- section. Dan treated him really successfully.’

That’s amazing Phil so what’s next for you?

‘A goal of a sub 2:20 marathon, top 5 position in the worlds and a sub 66.5 mins for a half marathon’.

Maybe an English vest for you there then?

‘That would be great fun! ‘

It was a great to chat and to be inspired by a hard working guy, with a busy life, work, family and love for his sport. We all wish him the very best for next season and hopefully he has inspired a few of us to get our running.

If you feel you could benefit from treatment by the team at Magdalen Active Health then please contact them on 01392 428141 to book an appointment. 1 Fairpark Road, Exeter EX2 4HL. www.exeterosteopaths.co.uk

 

Book Online

 

 


jennyjordan7.jpg
16/Oct/2019

Jenny Doe – Osteopath & Adventurer

What an incredible week, Ultra-X Jordan 2019 testing the limits of what the human body and mind can achieve. Nearly 80 runners covering 250km over 5 days in the furnace of the Wadi Rum desert in Jordan.

Myself and other Osteopaths from @osteo_adventures armed with sharp elbows and miles of tape were available predawn before every start, at each checkpoint along the way, and ready and waiting at the finish, working well into each night with headtorches to treat every runner that wanted our help.

We worked alongside Doctors from @exilemedics with their ninja blister lancing skills and persuasive water/salt management advice.

The runners pitted themselves against relentless heat, searing sun, sand stretching to all horizons, and the toughest battle of all…mastering their minds. It takes bravery and courage to put a toe on the start line of this event, let alone conquer and tame dark creeping thoughts that can appear for hours on end…and then to repeat it 4 more times knowing what lies ahead!

All devilishly dreamed up and made possible by @mrjamiesparks and @hewardsam, held together by the amazing and cheerful @ultraxco crew, and documented beautifully by @benedict_tufnell and @davies_sam.

To the runners, you show to yourselves and the rest of the world just what the human spirit is capable of. Thank you for giving me an unforgettable experience belonging to this awesome temporary tribe.

If you have running injury or any kind of sports injury book in with Jenny for an expert opinion now

BOOK NOW


12/Sep/2019

 

Whether it is in the home or garden, injuries do happen, so here are our tops tips for keeping you healthy:

  1. Ask yourself– do I have the knowledge, competence and fitness for this job?
  2. Think about your safety and the safety of those around you when planning and carrying out the task. Common injuries are: cutting and piercing, falls from ladders, chairs or stools, being struck by an object and a foreign body in the eye.
  3. Prepare well.Check you have the correct safety clothing, that you have the appropriate tools, your tools are in good working order and you use them correctly.
  4. Hedge cutting / painting and decorating:Ideally you should not use your arms above shoulder height as this increases the risk of injury to your arms and upper back and neck. When using a ladder or stool, do not over reach and make sure that you are standing on the equipment correctly.  This will mean that you have to move your ladder/stool more times, but decreases the risk of falling as well as over using your upper back, neck, shoulders and arms.
  5. Gardening:Make a list of what needs to be done by the end of day/weekend and then look at how you will be using your body. Ideally you want to keep changing the use of your body, so you don’t overuse any areas and risk injury. For example, you may spend 10 minutes digging until you feel your back beginning to tire, you may then spend 10 minutes doing a task that requires standing, such as potting up in the greenhouse, you may then spend 10 minutes kneeling and weeding. 5-10 minutes rest with a drink and start the process all over again.
  6. Lawn mower:If you have an electric mover, there will be a tendency to either use it as you would a vacuum cleaner or swing it from side to side – moving the body and keeping the feet still. A back injury waiting to happen! You need to walk behind the mower creating nice stripes, using the body as a whole.
  7. Lifting / bending or twisting:Whether it’s laying a patio, putting together furniture or having a good declutter, using your body correctly is vital. Lifting, bending and twisting, if done incorrectly or repeatedly can cause you much pain and discomfort, if not immediately then a few days or weeks later.

We have a habit of keeping our feet glued to the floor and moving our back/spine to do the task. It is much better if you keep the back/spine aligned and use your feet to move your body – think about how you twist and reach for an object – I bet you don’t move your feet!

When lifting, if you can, make sure that you have a wide legged stance and squat to pick up the item.  If necessary get someone to help you. We hope that you remain injury free, but we are here to help if you pull a muscle, tweak your back or neck or find that getting out of your chair or bed in the morning is now difficult.

 

Of course we are here to help if you do suffer a strain or injury.

Call us to book with one of our team on 01392 428141

or BOOK ONLINE from this link


Older-couple-exercise-1.png
12/Sep/2019

 

 

Recent research indicates regular exercise for our heart and muscles helps prevent many health problems.

 

Obesity, Diabetes, Heart Disease and Depression are just some of the health problems which are avoidable.

 

Keeping mobile can enhance the quality of our twilight years enormously. Muscle and bone mass start to decrease by the age of 50. Strength training twice a week can help prevent this. Aerobic fitness when we get a little puffed is great for keeping heart and circulation working well.

 

The advice suggests any activity is better than none at all. Kids should be running around outside as much as possible. Between 19 and 64 years we should be active on a daily basis with some heavy resistance work included. After 64 we should aim for 150 minutes of moderate activity per week. Tai Chi, bowls or dance are perfect for this age group.

Often we have old injuries or pains which discourage us from exercising for fear of aggravating them. Often it is about knowing how to approach exercise to prevent harm.

Osteopaths are perfectly suited to helping educate you about your body and what types of exercise would suit you.

As well as that we can alleviate pain and stiffness to give you the confidence to pursue some of these enjoyable pastimes.

At Magdalen Health we run a Saturday morning yoga class for all age groups. The group is small and with close supervision you can benefit enormously.

 

Call us today if you feel you need to change your lifestyle so that it is aligned with your health goals.

01392 428141

or book online 

www.magdalenhealth.co.uk


Untitled-design-4.png
12/Feb/2019

This Valentine’s day choose to love your body!
“The greatest risk [of an early death] was in those classed inactive, and that was consistent in normal weight, overweight and obese people,”

Everyone needs to exercise and MOVE regardless of whether they are trying to maintain healthy weight or not.

We have seen many clients who’s natural metabolism and diet keep their weight within a healthy range but on the exercise front they do very little. So many clients have computer bound desk jobs and we see the effects of inactivity walking through our practice doors every day. Possibly two of the most common things that we Osteopaths treat are:

1) Injury and or pain from the wrong type of movements

2) injury and or pain from lack of movement.

Lack of movement is a huge issue for most desk workers. There are roughly 360 joints in the human body. Where there is a joint there was intended to be movement. There are muscles and ligaments that surround the joint which enable and control the movement.

Do the wrong type of movements and you can damage and inflame the joint, ligaments and or muscles. Do limited or no movement at that joint and it will become stiff and surrounding ligaments and muscles can become stiff and weak making the area sore and stiff and primed for an injury. Sitting all day in an office chair or driving for hours on end both lead to stiff joints, sore, stiff and tight muscles that give neck pain, back pain and headaches. It becomes really easy for people who have been sedentary for long periods to do injury themselves doing seemingly simple movements when they get up away from the office chair/out of the car.

If you are in a sedentary job you need to look for ways to get more movement into your joints over the course of the day and ways to keep your muscles flexible and strong.

Here are some simple tips to get you moving more in your day:

1) 20 minute walk before, after or during a break at work.
2) Leave the building at least once during the day.
3) Use stairs where possible.
4) Frequents breaks from the desk/car where you can get up and move around.
5) Frequent stretches (even stretches at your desk/sat in traffic can help!)
6) Make sure your work station/car seat is set up as best as it can be
7) Warm up/cool down movements before or after sport, run, work-out session.
8) Less screen time at home (don’t let the box sets suck you in!)
9) Active weekends – These can be FUN!

Show your body some love by moving more!

by Jenny Doe, registered Osteopath
Let us help you to keep moving and loving life, book online with us today!

11/Feb/2019

by Kieron Kerr, Registered Osteopath

One of the first questions I ask patients when I begin to assess an injury or discuss their exercise programme is whether they warm up or cool down or both.

The stock answer is “ooh a little bit of stretching here and there!” Which at least is something! But if we began to understand the significance of both warming up and cooling down we can go along way to reducing the likelihood of injury.

The founder of osteopathy Andrew Taylor Still had several tenets of Osteopathy which he has become famous for and are oft quoted. Perhaps the most salient in this topic is ‘the rule of the artery is supreme’. Simply meaning if there are no obstructions to the artery reaching its designated part of the body then there is less chance of dysfunction. This is highly appropriate in muscle function as without the nutrients and fluid that blood brings to a muscle it can become laboured and prone to tearing.

The warm up before activity whether it is running, gardening or playing golf is crucial. Always try to mimic the motions and movement patterns that you will be performing but at a much lesser pace. Think about the muscles you will be using and the postures you will be adopting and ensure that blood flow is getting to this area by gently mobilising each area.

If you spend a good ten minutes warming up then you will be in good form to go about your activity. The benefits and importance of warming up can be illustrated by the Great Britain rowing four in the Olympic final who warmed up by rowing 10,000 metres the morning of the final. This is 5 times the length of the actual race!

Once your activity has finished, it is important to allow muscles that have been active to gently glide into rest by slowing down your movements and gently mobilise each joint or muscle by gently stretching it out. This will help to prevent stiffening of muscles and joints as it allows the body to adjust to the change in velocity of movement.

Do you need help with an old injury which is affecting your activities?

Hit the Book Now Button above and Kieron will fix you up!


Ankle-sprain-paid.png
28/Jun/2018

Ankle sprains are one of the most common sporting injuries.

Sprains are tearing of ligaments, ranging from small tears to full ruptures. Ligaments help in stabilising a joint by connecting bones together. Ankle sprains can take between 2 – 6 weeks to resolve, however severe sprains can take as long as 12 weeks.
Ankle sprains change in their presentation depending on their severity.

You might find that it can be:

Tender to touch,

Hard to weight bear or walk on,

Feel unstable,

Have a loss of balance.

Have swelling or bruising to the area.

We advise use of the RICE protocol for the first 24-48hrs and if required, seek medical assistance to determine the extent of the damage.

This involves:

R est

I ce. 20 minutes on and at least 10 minutes off before reapplying. Don’t apply ice straight to the skin – this can cause further problems to your skin!

C ompression. A compression bandage can help minimise the swelling and bleeding to the joint and surrounding tissue.

E levation – keep the foot and leg elevated to help decrease swelling and minimise pain and discomfort.

Risk factors to ankle sprains range include poor balance and increased joint mobility. However…the greatest risk factor is previous ankle injuries. This is where proper rehabilitation is so important, to help prevent any further injuries.

A structured rehabilitation program should include flexibility, stretching, balance, strength and sport specific exercises. When discussing rehab for ankles, osteopaths concentrate on two different aspects; strength and proprioception.

Strength comprises of working on muscles in the foot, ankle, calf, knee, hip and pelvis. This will allow greater control of the ankle and allow a more powerful muscular stability and contraction. Exercises may be prescribed for you by your osteopath. These may include calf raises or working with a theraband for some resistance training for the muscles and joints.

Proprioception involves knowing where your body is in space, without having to look at it. eg, is your arm by your side or above your head? It allows your body to understand its position. This means if you stand on uneven ground, your body’s innate awareness – through its proprioception mechanism – will be able adjust your footing and positioning so you don’t fall over. This is imperative to your balance and coordination!

Exercises such as balancing on one leg, or writing the alphabet with your big toe, are excellent ways to improve your proprioception.

Osteopathy also assists with treatment. We can treat swelling of the foot, ankle and calf, which may be present, release of any tight muscles and encourage return of ‘normal’ joint range of motion. Our guidance on rehabilitation and treatment will allow you to return to sport, (or normal activities!) in the quickest and safest way, as well as reduce the risk of any reoccurring injuries.

BOOK NOW ONLINE with Jenny for expert ankle care


feet.png
26/Jun/2018

Plantar fasciitis involves pain and inflammation of the band of tissue running across the sole of the foot, the plantar fascia.
A patient came into clinic 8 weeks ago with severe plantar fasciitis, he was unable to put any pressure on his left foot, and as a result had not been to work for a week. The pain was worse the first thing in the morning and after sitting for prolonged periods of time. He described the pain as 9/10.
He was treated using acupuncture and electro-acupuncture and after 2 treatments he noticed that he was walking better, his pain was 4/10, which enabled him to go back to work.
After 4 treatments his pain had reduced to 2/10 and now 8 weeks on he has reported he is totally pain free.

If you suffer from Plantar Fasciitis or heel pain why not give acupuncture a go, it could work wonders!!

Book Online now with Esmee


ExeterOsteopathsHeadshots-2-square-1200x1200.jpg
07/Jun/2018

Q: Can you give me some exercises to strengthen my back?

A: The back is already a strong structure. Although you are experiencing pain in the low back it does not mean that it is weak or liable to further injury. Most back pain stems from an overstrain where the supporting mechanisms such as the upper back and the hips are not functioning correctly and therefore placing more strain on the low back. If we focus on working on our areas of prime movement like the mid spine, hips and feet our stabilizing areas such as the low back can focus on providing the support for the upper and lower torso.

Q: I have terrible hayfever at the moment, any advice?

A: Having hayfever myself, I know how debilitating it can be. I offer the same advice that is online such as changing clothes after being outside, wearing sunglasses, Vaseline on the nostrils to prevent the pollen entering the nasal passages. Also I tend to have 2 cold showers a day and reduce the intake of sugar. With hayfever the body is heating up and like a bee sting inflammation builds up within the tissues, so we need to bring down the body’s temperature and reduce the possibility of inflammation which sugar can also do. The two cold showers are harsh to begin with! But within a few days you will begin to see the benefits.

Q: I have bought some new trainers as I have been told I over pronate, I am still having problems when running, what could it be?

A: Most people over pronate. What that means is, when the heel strikes the floor, the foot will flatten to provide a stable base to continue walking or running. What happens then is that the foot should supinate or roll out so that can prepare the body for the next stage of movement. The issue is not whether you over pronate but whether you can sufficiently supinate afterwards. If that is a problem and you are stuck in pronation, exercises and treatment can help to get you to a more balanced level.

Any more questions, just email us

info@exeterosteopaths.co.uk


We aim to provide immediate relief from unnecessary aches and pains through a variety of treatments; enabling you to live a more active, healthy and pain-free life.

Contact Us

© 2018 Exeter Osteopaths | Website design by Nettl